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Can you pass this one question quiz? 

Interviews happen everyday in a variety of settings. Think about this, though. Which employees are the hardest working multitaskers, making sure executives know where they need to be for their next meeting, keep stock closets full, invoices processed on time and making sure that the workspace generally runs smoothly?

The answer: if you said administrative support staff… Congratulations! You nailed it!

Because these admin support positions are so critical employers usually have extremely high expectations for candidates who apply for these positions. Don’t worry after tweaking your resume for an admin position hiring manager won’t be able to turn you down as long as you can answer these five questions.

 

Question: What do you do to stay organized?

Why they ask:

Any administrative support position needs to have highly organized people to fill these roles. If you can’t organize your own schedule, how will you keep your boss organized and on time?

What you say: 

You should be specific. Talk about managing your workspace and what systems you use to support that. Period what messaging in Calendar system do you use do you have a dedicated space for pending projects how do you keep your workspace physically clean and organized? showing the hiring manager how you’ve mastered the systems can make you much more attractive as a candidate.

 

Question: how do you manage stress?

Why they ask:

This is one of the more difficult areas to master. Juggling assignments one at a time and keeping cool or an absolute must to be successful in the administrative space. Prospective employers want to make sure you have strategies in place to manage job demands without caving in when the pressure is on.

What you say:

Lead with an example of past performance under pressure with a previous position. Here’s an example: “I got a frantic call from an executive one day, requiring me to drop everything and handle a change. The solution to this problem was communication… once I had the other managers on board and worked some extra hours I was able to meet his deadline without falling behind.“

 

Question: What are your strongest computer skills?

 

Why they ask:

It’s basically a fork on completion you’ll be using a computer most of the day, and it won’t be for social media. Diane Crompton, career coach and author of Find a Job Through Social Networking says, “Employers want to see that you’re current with administrative technology.” Some companies may even want you to take competency or skills tests for certain programs. 

During an admin support interview, be prepared to share your level of software proficiency.

What you say:

One of the best ways to show your technical prowess is to use appropriate language during the interview process. Use specific terms relating to the systems you’re familiar with. For example with XL talk about creating charts formulas macros, etc. as you discuss those skills, include metrics or benchmarks that quantify your achievements using those platforms. 

 

Question why do you want the administrative assistant position?

Why they ask:

In general, admin work can be quite tedious for many people. However, many enjoy it. Hiring managers just want to be sure it’s a genuine interest not a search for something “easier”.

What you say:

Hopefully it’s painfully obvious you can’t say something like “Because I need a job.” When you get this question the best approach is to talk about while you enjoy the support role and administrative work. Give me details about specific aspects of the job. Use a what and why approach if you like doing data entry mentioned that your detail oriented and enjoy project-based work. if you don’t say so, they’ll never know!

Question: Can you share an example of dealing with a difficult client or customer?

Why they ask: 

Many times support chops are internal positions, unlike receptionists, who interact with customers and clients. Hiring managers want to know how you manage interpersonal relationships, and how you avoid conflict.

What you say: 

Here’s the big flag! Any you encounter question that starts with “Tell me about a time when…“ , that’s a behavioral question. Employers like to use past experiences and behavior as an indicator of how you perform in the future. When you get these questions, it’s important to have a good story about an experience where you used communication and professional composure to respond to the situation. 

Another important detail questions to frame how the issue arose, then tell the story about how you handled it.

You got this!

Admin support staff to a large variety of work in their positions, so it makes sense that the interviews for those positions touch on a White variety of skills sets. You may get some of the answers more quickly than others but don’t sweat it. Another thing you may consider, is brushing up on soft skills as well.

 

If you’re looking for a new admin support or other opportunity, check our search engine for job seekers.

 

 

 

There are many entry points to developing diverse and inclusive companies and ideally, a company will pick the most important area to focus on first, based on a robust set of data about diversity and inclusion. Without the combination of diverse recruitment strategies and inclusive culture development, companies risk losing diverse candidates and their overall reputation with high turnover rates — or developing an inclusive culture for their all-white, all-male teams, which may make it harder to diversify and widen inclusion efforts later.

Tips for Expanding Diversity Through Recruitment

The following tips can help support diversity in your teams:

  • – Begin to hire from secondary schools. Attend job days as well as come prepared to talk about the advantages of benefiting your organization and your industry.
  • -Advertise with reputable vendors specialized in diversity recruitment
  • – Identify stereotypes of individuals who operate in your industry and develop methods for transforming perceptions i.e. Firefighting ought to just be a male profession.
  • – Use even more comprehensive language as well as visuals in rule books, alignment, and hiring products.
  • – Develop cross-cultural and cross-gender mentoring programs as well as supply training for advisors.
  • Establish connections with organizations and companies that are geared toward underrepresented groups.
  • – Know your own prejudices and stereotypes and their impact on the atmosphere.
  • – Create processes to make people who are in the minority feel welcome and included in your company.
  • – Mentor people who are from various cultural or ethnic backgrounds or gender from you. It will certainly assist you to become a lot more comfortable with other individuals as well as will certainly assist your personnel to grow in their careers.
  • – Integrate concepts from various other societies to address issues and be more cutting-edge.
  • – Use resources that are already in place and research what various other companies have done to be effective in their diversity recruitment efforts.
  • – Give cross-cultural communication training to aid staff job much better with each other and serve the customer population more effectively.
  • – Survey and interview team across demographics to establish their requirements in order to develop a tactical strategy for retention.
  • – Analyze your interpretation of leadership qualities to include ways in which people who have different thought processes and communication styles can lead. If you have been hierarchical in the past, begin discovering which individuals with different communication styles can also be effective leaders.
  • – Conduct exit meetings and identify patterns and motifs if they exist.
  • – Agree to alter to fit and make use of new ideas and encourage imagination.

Considerations for Expanding a Diverse Employment Pool

Broadening your recruitment to include fully diverse representation starts with understanding your current process and numbers. Questions you should work to answer:

  1. What is your current staff standard regarding diversity and inclusion — from entry level through leadership?
  2. What is your hiring process — from the time a candidate first hears about you to their first day on the job?
  3. Where are diverse candidates falling out of your hiring process?
  4. How can you improve your processes to better source, engage and support diverse candidates?

Regardless of where you start your diversity and inclusion work, recruiting efforts must be paired with developing a truly inclusive culture — which means deliberately designing inclusive spaces, meetings, communications, decision-making, and other processes; creating mentorship and leadership development programs; making compensation and promotion equitable and much more.