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Just a few hours at home can help your career advance more than you might think.

Among the steps you can take to help advance your career progression include making sure your resume is up-to-date and networking with people you meet.  Networking is a key component to a successful career advancement strategy because there are jobs out there just waiting to be filled.

 

Once you have successfully navigated your career advancement journey and landed a job, you need to prepare yourself for a rewarding future that’s even better than the one you’re on now. Being able to cultivate career equity is one of the keys to fulfilling your dreams of advancing professionally.

 

Communicating with Your Crew, Friends, and Allies is Crucial to Career Advancement

Not everyone has a near-perfect resume. The objective of this article is to provide some tips and pointers for you to prepare your resume for your next professional move. There are countless ways to add value to your CV and resume. Here are a few ways you can help make your resume standout from the crowd and stand out from the candidates vying for your services.

Note: There are several online tools to help you create and customize your own resume, one of which is Resume Workflow. You can also find many of these tools at Employers and Credentialing websites. However, some of these tools are better than others at certain key areas. If you are looking for one tool to help you create a good resume then don’t hesitate to consider these free online tools: Resume Generator, resumesByIvy, EHM Resume Maker, and Guidance

You’ll get some paid tools if you’re willing to shell out money, but it’s ultimately about being a team player. If you don’t communicate with others, it’s much harder for others to grasp your value. Furthermore, you may have trouble establishing a work-related relationship if you cannot convey the same value that is intrinsic in your resume.

Staying in touch with your network can help your career advancement

1. Increase your Structure

The most important aspect of your resume is the structure of your information. There’s a way to tell the truth without being honest. A nice way to begin is to be brief. If you’re writing a new resume, it’s advisable to explain where you’ve worked before you get started. By telling people about your previous job, you show they are able to learn from experience.

 

What you need to consider when writing a resume that gives a real sense of what you do is how you use structure. It’s important to be clear, concise, and to the point. Some people just write one page of resume, but some do a lot more. Here’s how to break up your resume to be clearer:

 

Use words that will cut through…Be specific…Don’t forget to pick your favorite words

2. Use Google to find relevant jobs

Finding new jobs is always helpful. You don’t have to get a job. We just need to get you the kinds of positions you need to fill.

 

The best way to get free information is to do research. Sometimes the web is a great place to start. At other times, you may need a professional search engine to get the answers you need for your career advancement and eventual retirement. 

 

Asking yourself questions is the most important step of all. What are the skills I need to have? Why should I be seeking a new job? How can I tell if the job will be great? What do I need to know about the organization? What information should I have before I go to interview?

Ask someone you know from school, a professional colleague, or someone you know from work how to fill out a resume. Remember: At an interview, they will look at the information you gave them and then be able to make an accurate assessment of your skills and experience. (See “The Perfect Resume For Your Interview”)

Having a current resume is an excellent practice

Look for chronological order of accomplishments.

All resumes have two basic sections: career experience and education. (If you have any questions about any of these factors, consult with an HR professional.) Once you know how much education you have, consider creating an account on LinkedIn. In addition to your Education section, you should also include important Career Advancement Summary information such as:

Organization experience (company, division, project, job, position, position manager)

Job title (where did the job originate and what was its duration)

Firm structure (how many persons do you have reporting to you)

City of residence

Employment options

Name of personal and professional home (if you have one)

Time worked at the organization (how many hours per week)

Employee rating from supervisors (or business partners)

You can sort your education/employment information in two ways: Alphabetically and Chronologically.

 

The searchable LinkedIn LinkedIn Education section indicates which jobs have you held (whether you are listed as “on the job” or “succeeded”).

 

Additionally, the education section displays an extensive list of jobs available to you.

 

To request a free LinkedIn search, you need to create an account and upload your resume.

 

Other Employers

 

Though no job search on LinkedIn is foolproof, several websites can help you find some of the best employers and positions on LinkedIn, including the following:

 

Employers and managers on LinkedIn search through multiple sources to find candidates for new positions.

 

Recruiter I-Square searches over 5 million LinkedIn profiles and has over 100,000 “sign-ups” per month.

 

Employers on LinkedIn do not have access to your private profile.

 

Employers only access your public profile and can not search through it.

 

LinkedIn.com is a Business

LinkedIn is a valuable tool for job searches and career advancement

Although LinkedIn is most popular as a workplace network, there are benefits of using the site as a business tool to help your career advancement.

 

Even if you don’t plan to start your own business, LinkedIn still offers access to a broader pool of candidates than just company personnel.

 

As a member of many HR systems, employers can see what you’ve done, what you look like and which areas of your LinkedIn profile you would be most interested in talking to.

 

If you’re actively looking for a job, your profile and cover letter can help you stand out from the crowd. This will also help you in your search and provide recruiters with the information they need to write a better cover letter.

 

How to Go Further with LinkedIn

 

There are hundreds of profiles with dozens of LinkedIn Groups just for employers, from popular “best” employers to smaller. However, the information you can uncover through these groups is far from complete. Keep digging and you’ll find your way. But most of all, try to enjoy it!

Check our job search engine while you’re at it.

No one can prepare for EVERY job interview question. Those sneaky interview questions that you wish you’d known were coming.

While there are as probably as many potential job interview questions as there are recruiters, it always is good to be prepared for anything. So, feast your eyes on this big fat checklist of potential interview questions.

Will you encounter them all? We hope no interviewer would be that sadistic.

 

Will you encounter a couple of them? Most likely.

 

Will you be well-served by being ready even if you’re not asked these very same ones? Without a doubt. To start your job interview planning adventure, have a look at these potential interview questions below.

 

Interviewing 101:

You could probably come up with most of these on your own. But just maybe there’s one interview question you never saw coming.

  • Why are you the right one to hire?
  • What strengths do you see yourself having?
  • In your previous position, what did you dislike?
  • How about weaknesses?
  • What’s your ideal employer like?
  • What draws you to this particular opportunity?
  • At what point did you most enjoy your work?
  • What attracted you to us?
  • Tell me something about you. (that’s not on your resume)
  • What do you bring to the table that others don’t or can’t?
  • Can you move to another location?
  • In your previous position, what were your responsibilities?
  • Why do you want to leave what you’re doing now?
  • What’s your familiarity with this line of work?
  • What do you know about us?
  • 5 years from now where do you see yourself career-wise?
  • Any questions I can answer?

 

It’s all part of the job, isn’t it?

  • How did the last project you led turn out?
  • Share an example of a time you put forth that extra effort beyond what was required. 
  • Have you had your work criticized? 
  • Is there a time when everyone on your team wasn’t doing their part? How did you deal with it?100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About
  • Can you recall a time you had to give challenging feedback? How did that go?
  • What’s your biggest failure and what did you learn?
  • When working with annoying people, how do you handle it?
  • As your supervisor, if I asked you to do something disagreeable, how would you handle that?
  • Can you share something difficult from your life and how you handled it?
  • Give me an example of how you handled a significant error.
  • Can you share how you’ve dealt with conflict in the workplace?
  • If you were at lunch and ordered a bacon cheeseburger with blue cheese, but the order came out with cheddar cheese and no bacon, how would you handle that?
  • How would you handle the discovery of fraud or other illegal activity?
  • Have you had a work assignment that was just too difficult? How did you handle it?
  • In the past two years, what has been your most challenging decision? How did you make it?
  • How would you handle multiple tasks with an unrealistic deadline?.

 

You want to get paid how much?

  • What do you have in mind for compensation?
  • What does your wage history look like?
  • If I were to provide you this wage you requested however allow you to create your work summary for the following year, what would it state?

 

So you’re looking for growth opportunities here?

  • What goals do you have for advancement?
  • Looking at the coming year how would you like to improve?
  • Specifically for this job, what goals would you have?
  • What additional training would your last supervisor recommend?

 

Don’t waste your time getting started:

  • How would you go about establishing a healthy bond with the team?
  • How long for you to make a substantial contribution?
  • What do you see getting done in the first 30 days of work?

 

Let’s Get Personal:

  • What’s your organizational style?
  • What would be your optimal workspace?
  • If you identified a preferred work culture — do you prefer organized or entrepreneurial?
  • What are some ideas you came up with or even implemented at work?100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About
  • What methods or tools do you use to stay organized?
  • Would you say you’re detail-oriented or big-picture?
  • What’s your all-time proudest accomplishment.
  • Tell me a little about your favorite manager?
  • What do you think of your most recent boss?
  • Was there a particular person of influence in your career?
  • If you chose a personality type to work with, what would it be?
  • What are you most proud of?
  • What are your biggest life dreams?
  • Do you have a personal mission statement? How did you come up with it?
  • What would you like to become in the future?
  • If we ask your former employer to name three positive traits what would they be?
  • If your last manager had a negative to express about you, what would it be?
  • What do you like to do?
  • How would your closest friends describe your character in three words?
  • What are the three favorable character traits you wish you had?
  • If you were interviewing someone for this position, what would you be looking for?
  • Five words that define your character: Go!

Since we’re talking about you…

  • Who has been the biggest influence on your career?
  • What do you fear the most?
  • Tell me about your biggest regret and why?
  • What’s the single most valuable lesson you learned in school?
  • Why did you select your field of study?
  • What do you think you’ll miss about your work if you join us?
  • How do you handle being told no?
  • What is your best accomplishment beyond work?
  • What are the qualities of a great leader? How about a poor leader?
  • A leader should either be feared or liked. What do you think?
  • How do you feel about working for someone with less experience or practical knowledge than yourself?
  • On a 1-10 scale, what do you think of me as a recruiter?
  • Share something about yourself you prefer I didn’t know.
  • What’s the difference between good and exceptional?
  • What sort of car do you drive?
  • No right or wrong answer. You can be ANYWHERE in the world right now. Where is it?
  • What’s the last book you read cover-to-cover?
  • Do you subscribe to any magazines?
  • You won the lottery…NOW WHAT?
  • Who are your heroes?
  • What do you do just for fun?
  • What do you enjoy in your spare time?
  • Tell me about your favorite memory from childhood?

 

Brainteasers:

Some interviewers will use these types of interview questions not so much for their answers, but to see the reaction it gets when asked, Or, the way in which the interviewee attempts to compose an answer or even just consider it.

  • How many street lights are there in New York City?
  • If you could pick one superhero power, what would you choose and why?
  • How many golf balls are there in Florida?
  • How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?
  • Why are manhole covers round?
  • How many times a day does a clock’s hands overlap?
  • Describe the internet to someone who just woke up from a 30-year coma.
  • You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and thrown into a blender. Your mass is reduced so that your density is the same as usual. The blades start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?

100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About

Still want more?

  • What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?
  • How would you test a calculator?
  • Sell this pencil to me.
  • What’s the number of times a clock’s hands overlap in a day?
  • Just how would certainly you consider an airplane without a scale?
  • How many golf balls can fit in a school bus?
  • Tell me 10 ways to make use of a pencil aside from writing.
  • Describe the internet to someone who just woke up from a 30-year coma.
  • If you were a pet, which one would you wish to be?
  • Why is a tennis ball fuzzy
  • How many gas stations are there in the United States? If you could eliminate just one of the US states, which one would certainly you do away with and also why?
  • With your eyes closed, tell me step-by-step how to link my shoes.
  • How much does the Starbucks in Times Square bring in, in annual revenue?

 

Being prepared for the interview questions you’ll encounter is such a large part of getting that job you’re really after. Even for that work-from-home job, you’ll need to do well on the interview, even if it is on Zoom, Skype or WebEx. Be sure to check our Career Search Engine too. https://veteransenterprise.com/want-to-work-from-home-kick-the-tires-first/

The restriction on sex discrimination in Title VII of the Civil Rights Act protects transgender and gay workers says the UNITED STATES Supreme Court in a landmark ruling on Monday, June 16.

Unexpected author for the majority…

For this historic discrimination ruling, Justice Neil M. Gorsuch wrote the opinion of the majority. The majority included Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan.

Today, we must decide whether an employer can fire someone simply for being homosexual or transgender,” wrote Gorsuch. “The answer is clear. An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex. Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids

Those who adopted the Civil Rights Act might not have anticipated their work would lead to this particular result. Likely, they weren’t thinking about many of the act’s consequences that have become apparent over the years, including its prohibition against discrimination on the basis of motherhood or its ban on the sexual harassment of male employees. But the limits of the drafters’ imagination supply no reason to ignore the law’s demands.

 

Prior to the Supreme Court

The ruling was released based on a combination of cases heard by the Court, Bostock v. Clayton County, Altitude Express v. Zarda, and also R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Service Homes v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

In Bostock, child advocate Gerald Bostock was discharged after he began participating in a gay entertainment softball league, resulting in defaming remarks from prominent members of the local area.

In Altitude Express, skydiving instructor Donald Zarda was discharged days after he discussed that he was gay. Zarda was later on killed in a skydiving accident.

In R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes,  terminated Aimee Stephens. The did so after she informed her company that she intended to live and work full-time as a female. Stephens died in May at age 59 after suffering from kidney disease.

 

The estates of Zarda and also Stephens continued the instances.

Gorsuch noted the “ordinary public meaning” of Title VII at the time of its fostering leads to “a straightforward rule” that a company breaches Title VII when it intentionally fires a private based partially on sex.

Gorsuch also pointed out the 1989 High court choice Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, which held that Title’s VII’s ban on sex discrimination shields those that don’t comply with gender norms.

 

Practical discrimination examples from Justice Gorsuch

Justice Gorsuch gave some examples of exactly how Title VII and Supreme Court precedent apply in cases of transgender and gay employees.

First, say a male employee and also a woman are both attracted to guys. Only the male employee is terminated because of that attraction. In doing so, the employer intentionally singles out the male employee in part due to the employee’s sex, Gorsuch claimed.

A transgender staff member as well as a woman employee both identify as women. The company fires only the transgender staff member. In this case the company intentionally penalizes a person identified as male at birth for attributes or actions that it endures in a worker identified as female at birth, Gorsuch stated.

It isn’t a defense for the company to say it discharges all male and women workers that are homosexual or transgender, Gorsuch claimed.

Justice Gorsuch continues “So just as an employer who fires both Hannah and Bob for failing to fulfill traditional sex stereotypes doubles rather than eliminates Title VII liability, an employer who fires both Hannah and Bob for being gay or transgender does the same.”

 

Nation’s largest attorney group is on board.

https://equalitymagazines.com/discrimination-supreme-court-issues-ruling/

Judy Perry Martinez, ABA President

 

American Bar Association head Judy Perry Martinez applauded the choice in a statement published Monday.

The American Bar Association celebrates today’s landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision vindicating the civil rights of transgender workers, and lesbians, gay men, and bisexual workers,” Martinez said. In its 6-3 decision, “the court affirmed the right to work in this country free of discrimination because of gender identity or sexuality, a right the ABA defended in an amicus brief it filed in the case.

 

The dissenters…

https://equalitymagazines.com/discrimination-supreme-court-issues-ruling

Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito

Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. dissented in a viewpoint joined by Justice Clarence Thomas.

“There is only one word for what the court has done today: legislation. The document that the court releases is in the form of a judicial opinion interpreting a statute, but that is deceptive,” Alito wrote.

 

Justice Brett M. Kavanaugh argued in a separate dissent. He said that there are excellent argued reasons to modify Title VII to protect discrimination on the basis of sexual preference, yet the question is for Congress to choose.

He wrote. “I have the greatest, and unyielding, respect for my colleagues and for their good faith.” Just Kavanaugh continued, “ But when this court usurps the role of Congress, as it does today, the public understandably becomes confused about who the policymakers really are in our system of separated powers and inevitably becomes cynical about the oft-repeated aspiration that judges base their decisions on law rather than on personal preference. The best way for judges to demonstrate that we are deciding cases based on the ordinary meaning of the law is to walk the walk, even in the hard cases when we might prefer a different policy outcome.

 

 

Search for job openings with our Career Search Engine.

There are many entry points to developing diverse and inclusive companies and ideally, a company will pick the most important area to focus on first, based on a robust set of data about diversity and inclusion. Without the combination of diverse recruitment strategies and inclusive culture development, companies risk losing diverse candidates and their overall reputation with high turnover rates — or developing an inclusive culture for their all-white, all-male teams, which may make it harder to diversify and widen inclusion efforts later.

Tips for Expanding Diversity Through Recruitment

The following tips can help support diversity in your teams:

  • – Begin to hire from secondary schools. Attend job days as well as come prepared to talk about the advantages of benefiting your organization and your industry.
  • -Advertise with reputable vendors specialized in diversity recruitment
  • – Identify stereotypes of individuals who operate in your industry and develop methods for transforming perceptions i.e. Firefighting ought to just be a male profession.
  • – Use even more comprehensive language as well as visuals in rule books, alignment, and hiring products.
  • – Develop cross-cultural and cross-gender mentoring programs as well as supply training for advisors.
  • Establish connections with organizations and companies that are geared toward underrepresented groups.
  • – Know your own prejudices and stereotypes and their impact on the atmosphere.
  • – Create processes to make people who are in the minority feel welcome and included in your company.
  • – Mentor people who are from various cultural or ethnic backgrounds or gender from you. It will certainly assist you to become a lot more comfortable with other individuals as well as will certainly assist your personnel to grow in their careers.
  • – Integrate concepts from various other societies to address issues and be more cutting-edge.
  • – Use resources that are already in place and research what various other companies have done to be effective in their diversity recruitment efforts.
  • – Give cross-cultural communication training to aid staff job much better with each other and serve the customer population more effectively.
  • – Survey and interview team across demographics to establish their requirements in order to develop a tactical strategy for retention.
  • – Analyze your interpretation of leadership qualities to include ways in which people who have different thought processes and communication styles can lead. If you have been hierarchical in the past, begin discovering which individuals with different communication styles can also be effective leaders.
  • – Conduct exit meetings and identify patterns and motifs if they exist.
  • – Agree to alter to fit and make use of new ideas and encourage imagination.

Considerations for Expanding a Diverse Employment Pool

Broadening your recruitment to include fully diverse representation starts with understanding your current process and numbers. Questions you should work to answer:

  1. What is your current staff standard regarding diversity and inclusion — from entry level through leadership?
  2. What is your hiring process — from the time a candidate first hears about you to their first day on the job?
  3. Where are diverse candidates falling out of your hiring process?
  4. How can you improve your processes to better source, engage and support diverse candidates?

Regardless of where you start your diversity and inclusion work, recruiting efforts must be paired with developing a truly inclusive culture — which means deliberately designing inclusive spaces, meetings, communications, decision-making, and other processes; creating mentorship and leadership development programs; making compensation and promotion equitable and much more.