Just a few hours at home can help your career advance more than you might think.

Among the steps you can take to help advance your career progression include making sure your resume is up-to-date and networking with people you meet.  Networking is a key component to a successful career advancement strategy because there are jobs out there just waiting to be filled.

 

Once you have successfully navigated your career advancement journey and landed a job, you need to prepare yourself for a rewarding future that’s even better than the one you’re on now. Being able to cultivate career equity is one of the keys to fulfilling your dreams of advancing professionally.

 

Communicating with Your Crew, Friends, and Allies is Crucial to Career Advancement

Not everyone has a near-perfect resume. The objective of this article is to provide some tips and pointers for you to prepare your resume for your next professional move. There are countless ways to add value to your CV and resume. Here are a few ways you can help make your resume standout from the crowd and stand out from the candidates vying for your services.

Note: There are several online tools to help you create and customize your own resume, one of which is Resume Workflow. You can also find many of these tools at Employers and Credentialing websites. However, some of these tools are better than others at certain key areas. If you are looking for one tool to help you create a good resume then don’t hesitate to consider these free online tools: Resume Generator, resumesByIvy, EHM Resume Maker, and Guidance

You’ll get some paid tools if you’re willing to shell out money, but it’s ultimately about being a team player. If you don’t communicate with others, it’s much harder for others to grasp your value. Furthermore, you may have trouble establishing a work-related relationship if you cannot convey the same value that is intrinsic in your resume.

Staying in touch with your network can help your career advancement

1. Increase your Structure

The most important aspect of your resume is the structure of your information. There’s a way to tell the truth without being honest. A nice way to begin is to be brief. If you’re writing a new resume, it’s advisable to explain where you’ve worked before you get started. By telling people about your previous job, you show they are able to learn from experience.

 

What you need to consider when writing a resume that gives a real sense of what you do is how you use structure. It’s important to be clear, concise, and to the point. Some people just write one page of resume, but some do a lot more. Here’s how to break up your resume to be clearer:

 

Use words that will cut through…Be specific…Don’t forget to pick your favorite words

2. Use Google to find relevant jobs

Finding new jobs is always helpful. You don’t have to get a job. We just need to get you the kinds of positions you need to fill.

 

The best way to get free information is to do research. Sometimes the web is a great place to start. At other times, you may need a professional search engine to get the answers you need for your career advancement and eventual retirement. 

 

Asking yourself questions is the most important step of all. What are the skills I need to have? Why should I be seeking a new job? How can I tell if the job will be great? What do I need to know about the organization? What information should I have before I go to interview?

Ask someone you know from school, a professional colleague, or someone you know from work how to fill out a resume. Remember: At an interview, they will look at the information you gave them and then be able to make an accurate assessment of your skills and experience. (See “The Perfect Resume For Your Interview”)

Having a current resume is an excellent practice

Look for chronological order of accomplishments.

All resumes have two basic sections: career experience and education. (If you have any questions about any of these factors, consult with an HR professional.) Once you know how much education you have, consider creating an account on LinkedIn. In addition to your Education section, you should also include important Career Advancement Summary information such as:

Organization experience (company, division, project, job, position, position manager)

Job title (where did the job originate and what was its duration)

Firm structure (how many persons do you have reporting to you)

City of residence

Employment options

Name of personal and professional home (if you have one)

Time worked at the organization (how many hours per week)

Employee rating from supervisors (or business partners)

You can sort your education/employment information in two ways: Alphabetically and Chronologically.

 

The searchable LinkedIn LinkedIn Education section indicates which jobs have you held (whether you are listed as “on the job” or “succeeded”).

 

Additionally, the education section displays an extensive list of jobs available to you.

 

To request a free LinkedIn search, you need to create an account and upload your resume.

 

Other Employers

 

Though no job search on LinkedIn is foolproof, several websites can help you find some of the best employers and positions on LinkedIn, including the following:

 

Employers and managers on LinkedIn search through multiple sources to find candidates for new positions.

 

Recruiter I-Square searches over 5 million LinkedIn profiles and has over 100,000 “sign-ups” per month.

 

Employers on LinkedIn do not have access to your private profile.

 

Employers only access your public profile and can not search through it.

 

LinkedIn.com is a Business

LinkedIn is a valuable tool for job searches and career advancement

Although LinkedIn is most popular as a workplace network, there are benefits of using the site as a business tool to help your career advancement.

 

Even if you don’t plan to start your own business, LinkedIn still offers access to a broader pool of candidates than just company personnel.

 

As a member of many HR systems, employers can see what you’ve done, what you look like and which areas of your LinkedIn profile you would be most interested in talking to.

 

If you’re actively looking for a job, your profile and cover letter can help you stand out from the crowd. This will also help you in your search and provide recruiters with the information they need to write a better cover letter.

 

How to Go Further with LinkedIn

 

There are hundreds of profiles with dozens of LinkedIn Groups just for employers, from popular “best” employers to smaller. However, the information you can uncover through these groups is far from complete. Keep digging and you’ll find your way. But most of all, try to enjoy it!

Check our job search engine while you’re at it.

No one can prepare for EVERY job interview question. Those sneaky interview questions that you wish you’d known were coming.

While there are as probably as many potential job interview questions as there are recruiters, it always is good to be prepared for anything. So, feast your eyes on this big fat checklist of potential interview questions.

Will you encounter them all? We hope no interviewer would be that sadistic.

 

Will you encounter a couple of them? Most likely.

 

Will you be well-served by being ready even if you’re not asked these very same ones? Without a doubt. To start your job interview planning adventure, have a look at these potential interview questions below.

 

Interviewing 101:

You could probably come up with most of these on your own. But just maybe there’s one interview question you never saw coming.

  • Why are you the right one to hire?
  • What strengths do you see yourself having?
  • In your previous position, what did you dislike?
  • How about weaknesses?
  • What’s your ideal employer like?
  • What draws you to this particular opportunity?
  • At what point did you most enjoy your work?
  • What attracted you to us?
  • Tell me something about you. (that’s not on your resume)
  • What do you bring to the table that others don’t or can’t?
  • Can you move to another location?
  • In your previous position, what were your responsibilities?
  • Why do you want to leave what you’re doing now?
  • What’s your familiarity with this line of work?
  • What do you know about us?
  • 5 years from now where do you see yourself career-wise?
  • Any questions I can answer?

 

It’s all part of the job, isn’t it?

  • How did the last project you led turn out?
  • Share an example of a time you put forth that extra effort beyond what was required. 
  • Have you had your work criticized? 
  • Is there a time when everyone on your team wasn’t doing their part? How did you deal with it?100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About
  • Can you recall a time you had to give challenging feedback? How did that go?
  • What’s your biggest failure and what did you learn?
  • When working with annoying people, how do you handle it?
  • As your supervisor, if I asked you to do something disagreeable, how would you handle that?
  • Can you share something difficult from your life and how you handled it?
  • Give me an example of how you handled a significant error.
  • Can you share how you’ve dealt with conflict in the workplace?
  • If you were at lunch and ordered a bacon cheeseburger with blue cheese, but the order came out with cheddar cheese and no bacon, how would you handle that?
  • How would you handle the discovery of fraud or other illegal activity?
  • Have you had a work assignment that was just too difficult? How did you handle it?
  • In the past two years, what has been your most challenging decision? How did you make it?
  • How would you handle multiple tasks with an unrealistic deadline?.

 

You want to get paid how much?

  • What do you have in mind for compensation?
  • What does your wage history look like?
  • If I were to provide you this wage you requested however allow you to create your work summary for the following year, what would it state?

 

So you’re looking for growth opportunities here?

  • What goals do you have for advancement?
  • Looking at the coming year how would you like to improve?
  • Specifically for this job, what goals would you have?
  • What additional training would your last supervisor recommend?

 

Don’t waste your time getting started:

  • How would you go about establishing a healthy bond with the team?
  • How long for you to make a substantial contribution?
  • What do you see getting done in the first 30 days of work?

 

Let’s Get Personal:

  • What’s your organizational style?
  • What would be your optimal workspace?
  • If you identified a preferred work culture — do you prefer organized or entrepreneurial?
  • What are some ideas you came up with or even implemented at work?100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About
  • What methods or tools do you use to stay organized?
  • Would you say you’re detail-oriented or big-picture?
  • What’s your all-time proudest accomplishment.
  • Tell me a little about your favorite manager?
  • What do you think of your most recent boss?
  • Was there a particular person of influence in your career?
  • If you chose a personality type to work with, what would it be?
  • What are you most proud of?
  • What are your biggest life dreams?
  • Do you have a personal mission statement? How did you come up with it?
  • What would you like to become in the future?
  • If we ask your former employer to name three positive traits what would they be?
  • If your last manager had a negative to express about you, what would it be?
  • What do you like to do?
  • How would your closest friends describe your character in three words?
  • What are the three favorable character traits you wish you had?
  • If you were interviewing someone for this position, what would you be looking for?
  • Five words that define your character: Go!

Since we’re talking about you…

  • Who has been the biggest influence on your career?
  • What do you fear the most?
  • Tell me about your biggest regret and why?
  • What’s the single most valuable lesson you learned in school?
  • Why did you select your field of study?
  • What do you think you’ll miss about your work if you join us?
  • How do you handle being told no?
  • What is your best accomplishment beyond work?
  • What are the qualities of a great leader? How about a poor leader?
  • A leader should either be feared or liked. What do you think?
  • How do you feel about working for someone with less experience or practical knowledge than yourself?
  • On a 1-10 scale, what do you think of me as a recruiter?
  • Share something about yourself you prefer I didn’t know.
  • What’s the difference between good and exceptional?
  • What sort of car do you drive?
  • No right or wrong answer. You can be ANYWHERE in the world right now. Where is it?
  • What’s the last book you read cover-to-cover?
  • Do you subscribe to any magazines?
  • You won the lottery…NOW WHAT?
  • Who are your heroes?
  • What do you do just for fun?
  • What do you enjoy in your spare time?
  • Tell me about your favorite memory from childhood?

 

Brainteasers:

Some interviewers will use these types of interview questions not so much for their answers, but to see the reaction it gets when asked, Or, the way in which the interviewee attempts to compose an answer or even just consider it.

  • How many street lights are there in New York City?
  • If you could pick one superhero power, what would you choose and why?
  • How many golf balls are there in Florida?
  • How much should you charge to wash all the windows in Seattle?
  • Why are manhole covers round?
  • How many times a day does a clock’s hands overlap?
  • Describe the internet to someone who just woke up from a 30-year coma.
  • You are shrunk to the height of a nickel and thrown into a blender. Your mass is reduced so that your density is the same as usual. The blades start moving in 60 seconds. What do you do?

100 Plus Interview Questions to Think About

Still want more?

  • What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?
  • How would you test a calculator?
  • Sell this pencil to me.
  • What’s the number of times a clock’s hands overlap in a day?
  • Just how would certainly you consider an airplane without a scale?
  • How many golf balls can fit in a school bus?
  • Tell me 10 ways to make use of a pencil aside from writing.
  • Describe the internet to someone who just woke up from a 30-year coma.
  • If you were a pet, which one would you wish to be?
  • Why is a tennis ball fuzzy
  • How many gas stations are there in the United States? If you could eliminate just one of the US states, which one would certainly you do away with and also why?
  • With your eyes closed, tell me step-by-step how to link my shoes.
  • How much does the Starbucks in Times Square bring in, in annual revenue?

 

Being prepared for the interview questions you’ll encounter is such a large part of getting that job you’re really after. Even for that work-from-home job, you’ll need to do well on the interview, even if it is on Zoom, Skype or WebEx. Be sure to check our Career Search Engine too. https://veteransenterprise.com/want-to-work-from-home-kick-the-tires-first/

Thanking your interviewer could make the difference.

So…you’ve applied! You submitted your resume and got the call! Now you just need to pass the interview and get the job! Taking a moment for an extra step AFTER the interview could just be the missing link. Many officers and senior enlisted do this interview tip…it can get you hired!

Putting in the time to thank an interviewer after a job interview with a thank you letter, note, or email is not just good interview etiquette, it also strengthens your interest in the position.

Sending a thank you note can provide you an edge over other candidates who may disregard to do so. In fact recruiters love getting thank-you notes, but only report receiving them 24% of the time.

What Your Thank You Note Accomplishes

Your thank you note can be a space to deal with any concerns or issues that turned up during the interview. Too, you can consider your thank you letter a follow-up sales pitch. In it, you can restate why you desire the job, summarize your credentials, share how you might make contributions to the organization, and so on. It’s an opportunity to remind job interviewers why you’re the very best prospect for the job.

Your thank you letter is also the best opportunity to talk about anything of significance that you didn’t address as completely as you would have liked throughout the job interview.

Keep in mind, though that your thank you keep in mind should be quick and to the point. A number of short paragraphs are plenty. Remember it’s not how much you write, it’s just doing it that makes interviewers rave about this single action!

If you’re not exactly sure how to compose a letter thanking your interviewer, put in the time to evaluate some sample thank you letters, thank you notes, and thank you email messages. This single interview tip can get you hired.

Usage Key Facts From the Interview in Your Thank You

There are a couple of crucial facts you’ll require to remove from your interview, so you can get your thank you letter right.

First and most significantly, you’ll need to understand who interviewed you. What was her name and how is it properly spelled? Does she pass a more formal name on her company card? What was her title? This is where exchanging organization cards is handy.

If you don’t have service cards or for some reason that exchange didn’t happen, inspect the business directory or website to obtain this info. The information might also be available from e-mails sent out prior to the interview.

Others might have entered the interview room briefly or joined you for a tour of the office or facility. It is good to exchange business cards with them too. You can mention them in your note to your primary interviewer. Depending upon the length of time you invested with them, you may want to send out those individuals a thank you note also.

It never hurts to be top of mind for multiple people at the company with which you are interviewing. You never ever truly know who will lobby for you to be the leading choice. Be sure they have your contact details on your card and send them a thank you letter if you feel it is suitable. At any rate this interview tip is a winner.

You might also wish to take a mental note of what you liked best about the workplace, and any pastimes or interests you shared with the recruiter. These can make good additions to personalize your thank you note, and maximize the effect of this interview tip.

What’s the Best Option: Sending Email, A Printed Note, or Handwritten Card?

In bygone days, only a composed card or letter would do. However these days an e-mail is appropriate as a thank you for a job interview. But remember not to be too informal– use formal titles and proper salutation and signature.

A typed and signed letter is also excellent and even a handwritten card might be a great touch depending on the job interviewer and the type of job you requested.

No matter how you make up and send your note, make sure to proofread it, and look for any spelling mistakes or typos. A simple mistake might be a big strike against you.

The best part about using an e-mail is speed and precision of delivery. While any type of interaction can go astray, if you have actually already exchanged e-mails you can be sure your thank you note will be received by the job interviewer. A printed note or card can be more individual in touch however might take longer to reach the interviewer, especially in a larger business with a huge mailroom where pieces of mail exchange lots of hands.

When to Send Your Message

But while email can be sent out immediately, it’s best to wait for at least half a work day before sending it. If your interview took place in the afternoon, send it out the next early morning. If your interview was in the morning, send your note near the end of the workday.

Here’s a quick recap:

ALWAYS SEND INTERVIEWERS A THANK YOU NOTE.

It’s good manners, and likewise a chance to make the case for your candidacy yet once again. And of course interviewers rave about this single interview tip!

KEEP YOUR NOTE SHORT.

Do not let your message drag on. Keeping it to one or two points in addition to revealing your appreciation to the job interviewer.

GET A BUSINESS CARDS DURING YOUR INTERVIEW.

That method, you’ll have contact info easily offered.

PROOFREAD CAREFULLY.

Read your note numerous times to avoid spelling mistakes and typos.

 

Check our Career Search Engine for positions you haven’t thought of, And, our blog for more tips and timely information to help you succeed!

Your Bilingual Spanish Skills Are In High Demand

In virtually any career field, Your Spanish language skills can be handy. But more than that, there are some careers that actually need Spanish language skills. Which means one thing: Employability!

 

With your Spanish language skills at a native level, you’re currently one step better to some fantastic jobs.

Why Do So Many Jobs Require Spanish language skills?

It’s clear that increasingly more employers are seeking Spanish-speaking employees in your home and abroad– but why?

One factor is that the Hispanic populace in the US is continuously climbing up. The United States Demographics Bureau reports that the Hispanic populace is over 55 million (over 17% of the populace) and also rising. With a respectable percentage of this populace speaking Spanish as a key (or a minimum of preferred) language, all areas of the economic climate need staff members who speak both Spanish and English to involve and also fit the transforming demographics. According to a story published by  Kennesaw State University, multilingual worker demand will be increasing for years to come.

 

10 Jobs That Can Utilize Your Spanish Language Skills

1. Teacher

You’re possibly believing “well, of course you require to speak Spanish to be a Spanish educator.” You’re. There are other training jobs that require Spanish, too.

For instance, multilingual education and learning focuses on presenting information in two languages. In the United States, several bilingual schools and programs utilize Spanish. If you’re interested, you might take a look at the National Organization for Bilingual Education and learning’s job board. Additionally, in locations with huge Hispanic populaces, several ESL jobs need or like somebody with Spanish skills.

2. Interpreter/Translator

Interpreters as well as translators help people that do not speak the very same language to connect with each various other. Whether the interaction is talked or in composing, they take details from one language and also alter it to the various other.

Interpreters as well as translators can work in a selection of settings. Clinical translator/interpreter work is particularly common. There are also jobs offered in government, the court system as well as via private translation business. As well as, you can always attempt your hand at freelancing in your area and also online, making use of web sites like translate.com and ProZ.

 

3. Use Your Spanish language skills as a Customer Care Rep

While there are a lot of customer support work offered that do not call for Spanish, the work that do call for Spanish typically pay more as a result of the extra skill needed. As well as allow’s face it– who does not intend to make money a lot more?

And also it only makes good sense that you get paid more– besides, speaking English and also Spanish indicates the variety of consumers you’re able to help is much higher than representatives that speak only one of the languages.

Customer care representatives work in phone call centers or in retail. Comparable jobs working in the tourism industy are also readily available.  You can occasionally find work operating at hotels, resorts and cruises abroad.

 

4. Sales Specialist

Remember that growing profession sector we went over? Well, someone requires to bargain those sales and acquisitions. This is where sales specialists been available in.

International sales experts buy and sell items from around the world. With your Spanish abilities, you prepare to do organization with Spanish-speaking countries. Firms in Spanish-speaking nations will usually considerably appreciate the visibility of a sales expert that can connect with their English-speaking clients, vendors and company companions.

 

On a smaller scale, if you live in a community with a big Hispanic population, you’ll most likely be able to find regional sales work marketing anything from autos to mattresses.

 

5. Physician

Sure, there are lots of work in the medical area that don’t need Spanish. In areas with big Hispanic populaces, Spanish is in high Bilingual Skills: Money In The Bankdemand. It’s much far better for people to be able to interact directly with a doctor or registered nurse instead than with a translator.

Any kind of clinical profession from nursing aide to nurse, medical professional, Emergency Medical Technician as well as medical assistant may make use of Spanish language abilities. Even if the work does not need it, it can absolutely help you advance in your area or make you a more desirable candidate. Furthermore, considering that doctor typically handle emergency scenarios, speaking Spanish can actually help you save lives.

6. Police Professional

Law enforcement is an additional profession where communication is extremely important, and also not having the ability to connect clearly can prove deadly.

In areas with large Hispanic populations, police officers typically require to know at least some Spanish so that they can much better safeguard everyone living in these multilingual communities.

Given that the US has nearly 2000 miles of boundary with a Spanish-speaking nation, numerous positions with the FBI and Border Patrol additionally call for Spanish.

7. Your Spanish language skills can be invaluable as a Social Worker 

Social workers work with individuals and family members on really intimate levels. They’re privy to exclusive info concerning delicate situations such as abuse, mental wellness concerns as well as other difficulties that households encounter. Therefore, it’s ideal to communicate in the language the clients are most comfy with. Because of this, neighborhoods with big Hispanic populaces frequently recruit Spanish-speaking social employees.

8. Author

Whether it’s journalism, web content writing, blog writing or public connections composing, the big Hispanic populace in the US means there’s a huge market for written materials in Spanish.

The capability to share info clearly in both Spanish and also English doubles your potential market. Because of this, lots of employers look for writers that can write in both languages. Additionally, considering that some writing jobs call for interviewing abilities, it will certainly assist to be able to interact with the interviewee in their main language.

9. Management Assistant/Receptionist

Due to the fact that of this, some settings may call for the assistant or management aide speak Spanish. Also if speaking Spanish is not a requirement, it’s a useful skill that’s likely to provide you the edge over various other prospects using for the setting.

10. Teller/Personal Lender

Bank bank employees handle the clients’ money, while individual bankers assist them handle their accounts in more depth. Given that money is constantly a sensitive issue, it helps to be able to discuss it in a language the consumer will certainly better Bilingual Skills: Money In The Bankrecognize.

Several bank employee and individual lender settings do not call for Spanish. However in communities with growing Hispanic populations, many positions will call for Spanish. And also this is most likely to be  increasing.

With all these great jobs requiring Spanish, you’ll undoubtedly locate something excellent to make a great income.

So exercise your Spanish language ability as an asset!

 

Be sure to check our Career Search Engine too.